White paper The impact of COVID-19 on deposit interest rate risk at banks

The coronavirus (COVID-19) hit Europe around February 2020, impacting the health of millions of people, leading to thousands of deaths. Businesses in many industries were hit and experienced lower outputs, while the stock markets plunged. Banks are affected not only by increased credit risk on loans to customers, but also by stressed deposit inflows or outflows. This has consequences from both an interest rate risk in the banking book (IRRBB) and liquidity risk perspective.

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Deadline for EMIR Refit on June 18th

Following the financial crisis that started over a decade ago, the European Union adopted the European Markets Infrastructure Regulation (EMIR) in 2012 to address shortcomings in the functioning of derivatives markets. The main objective of EMIR is to reduce systemic risk by increasing the transparency of the derivatives markets and to mitigate counterparty risk by requiring Over-the-counter (OTC) derivatives contracts to be cleared through Central Counterparties.

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Join Zanders in our co-development initiative for transfer pricing

The recent publication of the OECD transfer pricing guidelines creates a major shift in the pricing of intercompany financial transactions such as intercompany loans, financial guarantees, cash pools and in-house bank transactions. Treasury and tax professionals are strongly encouraged to revisit their current pricing methodology to ensure transfer pricing compliance. Therefore, on 2 June 2020, Zanders held a webinar on the impact of these new guidelines.

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Calmer conditions prevailing in European debt markets boost primary activity

‘Turbulent’ is a good way to describe the current financial markets. We feel that now is the right time to provide you with the latest insights on the European sovereign markets, primary activity in European debt markets and the financial robustness of financial institutions.

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Structural Foreign Exchange Risk in practice

Managing Capital Adequacy ratios through an open Foreign Exchange position

Since the introduction of the Pillar 1 capital charge for market risk, banks must hold capital for Foreign Exchange (FX) risk, irrespective of whether the open FX position was held on the trading or the banking book. An exception was made for Structural Foreign Exchange Positions, where supervisory authorities were free to allow banks to maintain an open FX position to protect their capital adequacy ratio in this way.

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